The biggest structure in the universe revealed: Astronom discover mysterious ring FIVE BILLION light years acros


Nine gamma ray bursts were seen 7 billion light years from Earth creating in a circle 36° across on the sky Gamma­ray bursts are the brightest objects in the universe and help astronomers map distant galaxies Astrophysical models suggest upper size limit for cosmic structures should be around 1.2 billion light­years Ring is five times as large and there is only a 1 in 20,000 probability the bursts are not somehow connected


By ELLIE ZOLFAGHARIFARD FOR DAILYMAIL.COM

 UPDATED: 10:09 GMT, 5 August 2015

Astronomers have found a structure in the universe so huge, that current cosmological theory says it shouldn't exist

A US­Hungarian team recently discovered a ring of nine gamma ray bursts, in nine distant galaxies, 5 billion light years across. For comparison, our galaxy is just a hundred thousand light­years across.


Gamma­ray bursts are the brightest objects in the universe, releasing as much energy in a few seconds as the sun does over its 10 billion year lifetime.



image

A US­Hungarian team recently discovered a ring of nine gamma ray bursts, in nine distant galaxies, 5 billion light years across. An image of the distribution of gamma­ray bursts (GRBs) on the sky at a distance of 7 billion light years, centred on the newly discovered ring. The positions of the GRBs are marked by blue dots and the Milky Way is shown for reference, running from left to right

Gamma­ray bursts are the most powerful explosions the universe has seen since the Big Bang.

They occur around once per day and are brief, but intense, flashes of gamma radiation.

They come from all directions and last from milliseconds to a few hundred seconds.

Recent evidence from recent satellites like Swift and Fermi indicate that the energy behind a gamma­ray burst comes from the collapse of matter into a black hole.

What is known, however, is that their huge luminosity helps astronomers to map out the location of distant galaxies, something the team exploited to find the structure.

Gamma­ray bursts are the most powerful explosions the universe has seen since the Big Bang.

They occur around once per day and are brief, but intense, flashes of gamma radiation.

They come from all directions and last from milliseconds to a few hundred seconds.

Recent evidence from recent satellites like Swift and Fermi indicate that the energy behind a gamma­ray burst comes from the collapse of matter into a black hole.

What is known, however, is that their huge luminosity helps astronomers to map out the location of distant galaxies, something the team exploited to find the structure.

Recent evidence from recent satellites like Swift and Fermi indicate that the energy behind a gamma­ray burst comes from the collapse of matter into a black hole.

Their huge luminosity helps astronomers to map out the location of distant galaxies, something the team exploited to find the structure.

The Gamma­ray bursts (GRBs) that make up the newly discovered ring were seen using a combination of space­ and ground­based observatories.

They appear to be at very similar distances from us – around seven billion light years – in a circle 36° across on the sky, or more than 70 times the diameter of the full moon.

This suggests that the ring is more than 5 billion light years across.

According to Professor Lajos Balazs of Konkoly Observatory in Budapest, there is only a 1 in 20,000 probability the GRBs being are in this distribution by chance.

Modern astrophysical models suggest that the upper size limit for cosmic structures should be no more than 1.2 billion light­years.

The newly discovered ring is almost five times as large.

The structure also defies a widely accepted cosmological principle, which says that the universe would look uniform when observed at the largest scales.